Sight & Sound

WATCH: Pennywise live in 1993 (Jason Thirsk vocals)

Our friends at Dying Scene have uncovered some rare live footage of Pennywise live from 1993. Live not because it is Pennywise from 1993, but because the footage showcases Jason Thirsk singing vocals in Jim Lindberg’s absence. Thirsk was the band’s bassist until 1996 when he was tragically killed in a freak gun accident.

The footage is from a 1993 Hollywood show which lasted about 16 minutes before cops showed up and shut it down.

Thirsk wrote the song “Bro Hymn” for his friends who were killed in a car accident. After Thirsk’s death, the band re-wrote the song for Thirsk and released it on their 1997 album Full Circle. You can listen to that version of the song here.

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Music, Sight & Sound

Watch Kid Dynamite from This Is Hardcore

Few bands will mean more to this site’s history than Philadelphia hardcore act Kid Dynamite. Their song, “Never Met The Gooch“, became the inspiration and namesake for the site’s original incarnation as Sound the Sirens Magazine.

Now more than a decade removed, the band have recently broken up (again), but not before performed at this year’s This Is Hardcore festival. The kind folks at Hate5Six.com filmed their entire set in HD so you could see this great band, if never again in person, then at least in film.

They were one of the great modern hardcore bands who never adopted the frills, the terrible metal breakdowns and all that hoopla about being “hardcore”. They just rocked out, wrote short, fast, loud songs and tore up the stage wherever they played without much fuss.

Kid Dynamite is dead, hardcore is dead. Long live Kid Dynamite, long live hardcore.

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Live Reviews

Live Review: Ash

Returning to Australia for the first time in years, Ireland alterna-rockers Ash turned the clock back at Melbourne’s Corner Hotel to play their acclaimed album, 1977, in its entirety. Not only were the band in exceptionally fine form, but the crowd, who looked like they were at the last Ash show (quite possibly on the original 1977 tour in 1996), were the most pleasant, down to earth and collected group of people I’ve seen at a show in years.

It was refreshing to say the least.

Racing through 1977, Ash proved that while they’ve been at it since the band members were 19, they were still as energetic and compact as they’ve ever been. Stand outs through the initial set were of course the Ash staples; “Girl From Mars” (still fantastic), “Angel Interceptor” and “Kung Fu”. Tim Wheeler was as unpretentious a rock star to have graced a stage in recent years as his genuine gratitude and enjoyment was evident through the set. With minimal banter between songs, there was little selling of merchandise or aggravating self importance, instead the band knew why they, and we, were there- to enjoy a great album from back to front.

As the band closed the album set, they wrapped up the pre-encore show with the terrific “Jack Names The Planets” and “A Life Less Ordinary”, before heading off for a quick break. The band returned to the appreciative crowd to close the night on Ash favourites from Free All Angels including “Walking Barefoot”, “Shining Light” and the terrific closer of the evening, “Burn Baby Burn”.

A tight and terrific hour and a half, Ash are a reminder of an era of music far removed from today’s YouTube generation. While it’s been years since 1977 and years since Ash’s brand of music graced the airwaves on a contemporary basis, the band are still as relevant and impactful today. Best of all? The crowd was almost all dickhead/hipster free.

Ash are playing one final Melbourne show at the Corner Hotel on August 29th. Tickets here.

 

ASH
August 22, 2013
Melbourne, AUS @ Corner Hotel

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