Headlines, Television

Why aren’t we watching The Michael J. Fox Show?

A few days ago I read a piece claiming the inevitable demise of NBC’s The Michael J. Fox Show and was saddened by the prospect of it ending so quickly. While ratings seem to have somewhat propped back up after the Chris Christie guest-starring episode (at least in the 18-49 demo), there is an air of weariness to it that indicates perhaps, the full season pick-up it received was a little premature.

It’s a shame really, because while The Michael J. Fox Show trades contemporary humourism for a more classic, older comedy routine, there is still a lot to like from it. Mostly because it’s Michael J. Fox (playing one-time NBC anchor Mike Henry who returns to the network as a reporter) and there is still something about him that captivates the screen. His vulnerability and charm come across sharper than its ever been and in reality, much of the show’s humour hinges on him being on screen (which thankfully, is for the majority of the show).

There are some struggles of course, the Modern Family-esque mockumentary narrative leaves a lot to be desired and would benefit the show greatly if it were written out completely. Secondly, some of the characters struggle greatly to really come across as appealing; namely Michael J. Fox’s on-screen sister (played by Katie Finneran) and his eldest son (newcomer Conor Romero). Both are unfunny and unfortunately, so unbelievably unbelievable the only ground they break is that of one dimensionality. Anne Heche’s guest starring role as Mike’s office spoil? Like a throwback to Murphy Brown except without the cantankerous Candice Bergen charm … leaving it more of an annoyance than anything else.

What does the Fox say?

What does the Fox say?

So what’s good about the show you ask? Well, Michael J. Fox. He’s that good that he’ll make up for the rest of the show’s shortcomings and awkward humour. He’ll play a Parkinsons joke and you’re about the burst out laughing before you stop and question your moral ground… then you see Fox light up on screen and laugh along with the joke and you know it’s okay.

There’s a sense that the show wants to find middle ground between the humour of the day (shows like Parks and Recs, Community) and remain relevant, and the humour Michael J. Fox did so well in both Family Ties and Spin City. Perhaps this writer is showing his age when he says that it would probably be advantageous for the show if it didn’t bother trying to be like Modern Family, and that there is a good family dynamic in this show that needs further exploration.

The show doesn’t need to try and be hip and contemporary, and it certainly doesn’t need to be a Parks and Recreation. The Michael J. Fox Show has one of the most enduring and well-loved personalities to have ever graced the small screen and it would be a mistake to try and cast the light on this show around anything, or anyone else. 22 episodes is how long it has to prove to NBC that its worth keeping around, and while the numbers will probably be less than stellar come season’s end, the show has a core that needs some time and life to breathe. Something sadly, doesn’t exist in the world of television.

Let’s start watching.

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The Michael J. Fox Show airs Thursday nights on NBC.

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