Single Reviews

Review: Arliss Nancy / Those Crosstown Rivals – Split 7″

tcrMuch has been said for American rock n’ rollers Arliss Nancy around these parts. Their new album Wild American Runners is easily one of the most stellar releases of 2013. This new 7” split from Shitstarter Records is both a great way to acquire some short run Arliss Nancy vinyl and a great way to discover this split’s other recording artist Those Crosstown Rivals. The latter, taking a page from the same Americana-drenched rock n’ roll book as Arliss Nancy, are a little less polished and more cow-punked, but still boast the same kind of urgency and guitar-fueled reflection as their split counterparts.

The 7” version of this release features a track each, the Wild American Runners featuring “Both Got Old” from Arliss Nancy and “Look At Me” by Those Crosstown Rivals. While the AN cut is from an album, the TCR song is something we haven’t heard yet, and it’s a rollicking train of Southern-flavored rock that’s got a little bit of classic Against Me! in it too.

For those who purchase this release digitally, you get two bonus tracks for your troubles; “Can’t Go Back” and “Kentucky Woman” from the artists respectively. Both are added reasons to sink your teeth into either band as they are both crafting songs of their genre with great success. You can’t go wrong with either band so why not get both?

[rating=4]

 

The Arliss Nancy / Those Crosstown Rivals Split 7″ is available now via Shitstarter Records. You can listen to Those Crosstown Rivals’ “Look At Me” below:

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Single Reviews

Review: Distance – “No Funeral”

distanceNewcastle, Australia’s Distance are a relatively new entity under the post-hardcore umbrella. And while they may still be a burgeoning act, these two new songs presented as No Funeral, prove they are way beyond their collective age as a band. Their sound, perhaps, isn’t best labelled under the genre we tend to associate bands boasting crunchy post-punk guitars, strong percussion work and vocals fueled by what sounds like rage and anger. For Australian listeners, Distance will probably remind them of lauded acts like A Death in the Family, but for North American ears, you’ll find that their brand of songs could slip off the back of the Avail truck.

There are two songs here, “Temporary” and “Winter Solstice”, and both acquit themselves really well. “Temporary” has a tinge of Samiam to it as the opening percussion/guitar combo crescendos to near perfect melodies. What can be noted from these two songs is the band’s vocal work that at times come across as similar to Chris Fields’ work in Jon Cougar Concentration Camp; rough and tumble-dried in a vat of whiskey and a thousand cigarettes. The second song however, “Winter Solstice”, is really where the band shines. Its mid-tempo reflections and melancholia is draped in soaring choral harmonies, while the band’s adept blend of punk and hardcore comes through in spades. It’s really a terrific song and if it is any indication of where this band will go, then Distance will certainly be one to keep your ears and eyes on.

[rating=4]

 

Distance’s No Funeral is now available digitally and on cassette tape(!) via Hindsight Records. You can listen to “Winter Solstice” below:

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Music, Single Reviews

Single Review: Brad Paisley – “Beat This Summer”

The second single from Brad Paisley’s upcoming Wheelhouse is quite unlike the album’s lead off. While the terrific “Southern Comfort Zone” had its honest-to-goodness nature worn heavily on its uptempo riffs and anthemic veneer, “Beat This Summer” is your more traditional country-infused go-around, but like much of what Paisley is doing with Wheelhouse, its modern country view of today’s world is as warm as its feelgood lyrical musings.

“Southern Comfort Zone” found itself traversing much of the world, overcoming critics of the sometimes self-centric nature of country music- singing about being a good ol’ country boy while having seen the streets of Rome and Paris, never leaving Tennessee at heart. And if that song sang about how not all country music lovers “watch NASCAR” or “owns a gun”, its follow-up is more simplistic and straight forward with its complexion- plenty of mid tempo twang and plucky solos. “Beat This Summer” isn’t as ambitious, but it is a nice alternative, keeping things at home with its allusions of love and summer.

Wheelhouse looks like it could be Paisley’s most ambitious record to date, and the first two singles are a nice indication of the varying scope of its material.

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